A Village in the Third Reich: How Ordinary Lives Were Transformed By the Rise of Fascism – from the author of Sunday Times bestseller Travellers in the Third Reich

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A Village in the Third Reich: How Ordinary Lives Were Transformed By the Rise of Fascism – from the author of Sunday Times bestseller Travellers in the Third Reich

A Village in the Third Reich: How Ordinary Lives Were Transformed By the Rise of Fascism – from the author of Sunday Times bestseller Travellers in the Third Reich

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Under his mayoralty, Oberstdorf became a relatively safe haven for Jews fleeing persecution elsewhere in Germany. But one thing stands out beyond doubt: even in the smallest of villages, the impact of Nazism and the Second World were inescapable. A new council was imposed on the village with a majority of Nazi councillors, together with a young and ambitious Nazi mayor, one Ernst Zettler. A traditional Catholic community of farmers, workers and middle-class entrepreneurs, which became popular among tourists at the turn of the twentieth century.

We meet the Jews who survived - and those who didn't; the Nazi mayor who tried to shield those persecuted by the regime; and a blind boy whose life was judged 'not worth living'.In Oberstdorf, support for Hitler and the Nazis declined as the numbers of dead and wounded increased.

As Oberstdorf's leaders had never shown much sympathy for left wing politics they had little reason to fear persecution. Yet most of the German villagers only really come to life at two points, firstly as the Allies draw closer and secret groups form to try and surrender Oberstdorf without destruction of life and property – in direct opposition to the Nazi directive and second, in the aftermath, the privation they suffered with the influx of refugees, displaced persons and Allied troops to accommodate and feed. The result is a fascinating (and sometimes disturbing) read, and a worthy follow-up to Boyd's "Travellers in the Third Reich. A Village in the Third Reich’ looks at history through the prism of Oberstdorf, a Bavarian village and holiday resort high up in the Alps.And so it went on in the village of Oberstdorf throughout the 1930s and 1940s, with the rise and fall of Nazism an undercurrent all along – except it was one that swelled in a way that even a quiet little village couldn’t ignore. The mayor, who may have had prior knowledge of Aktion T-4, managed to get his beloved epileptic son home in time, but for little Theodor it was already too late. she was the namesake of the Henriëtte de Beaufort Prize, is a triennial prize that was established in 1985 by the Society of Dutch Literature. The Oberstdorfers had their doubts about the upcoming national socialism; they were predominantly Catholic (Protestants were much more loyal and in larger numbers to Hitler than Catholics ever were), and they didn’t care if the people who came to their lovely village were black, white or Jewish, as long as they paid their fees and enjoyed their stay, and they made sure tourism was not interfered with by some silly rules from Berlin. Chapter 13 is devoted to the invasion of Russia in 1941, Operation Barbarossa, interspersed with entries from the diary of a soldier, Gerd Aurich, from a town near Oberstdorf, who is dead from his wounds by the end of the year.

I loved every minute, it was the best way to learn what it was like to be oppressed by hitlers German rule.Please try and join 5 minutes before the event start time and we will let you into the room (do try and bear with us if this takes a few minutes). It’s a very different perspective which spans a couple of fascinating decades as the aftermath of one war is felt and the build up to the next begins. All the German Volk—social, political, and cultural organizations—were to conform and merge with Nazi ideology and policy. Many people who otherwise would never join the Nazi party joined the NSV because it seemed so apolitical and beneficial.



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